PCPartPicker

  • Log In
  • Register

Build Guide

Excellent Gaming Build

by manirelli

65
211 Comments
NOTE: A more recent version of this guide is available here.

Description

For the Excellent Gaming Build build we selected the Intel i5-6600k as our processor. If you're not building a workstation or professional machine, this is the de facto standard for overclockable gaming builds at the moment. To cool the i5-6600k while overclocking we selected the Corsair H100i v2. The updated version of the original H100i is an excellent choice for our build and will keep the temperature of the CPU cool while overclocking.

To allow overclocking on the processor, we set the parametric filters for ATX motherboards that support up to 64GB of DDR4 memory, six SATA 6Gb/s devices, multiple expansion cards, and crossfire or SLI functionality. With our increased budget and the dwindling cost of memory we selected 16GB of RAM. The parametric filter finds the best price on 16GB kits of memory that are within Intel’s recommended specifications. Using the parametric filters this build will incorporate an SSD with at least 480GB of space and a minimum 3TB of mechanical storage at 7200rpm.

With this budget we decided to go all out on the graphics card. The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 is one of the single best cards on the market right now. At 1080p or even 1440p you will not have any problems with AAA games and the 1070 is perfectly suited for VR gaming as well. When using a GTX 1070 you should consider stepping up your monitor to a 120/144hz screen for the best gaming experience.

All of our components are housed in the Corsair Carbide 400C. This case has a gorgeous black or white finish depending on your selection, a large side panel window, room for enthusiast CPU coolers, watercooling radiators, and front panel USB3.0. For our power supply, we're using a parametric selection of well-reviewed fully and semi-modular units, all of which are 80+ Gold certified and provide more than enough power for this system while at stock clocks or overclocking.

Part List Customize This Part List

Compatibility Check: No issues/incompatibilities found.

Estimated Wattage: 367W
Component Selection Base Promo Shipping Tax Price Where
CPU £199.14 £199.14 Aria PC Buy
CPU Cooler £105.97 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime £105.97 Amazon UK Buy
Motherboard £98.47 FREE £98.47 CCL Computers Buy
Memory
From parametric filter
  • Type: 288-pin DIMM
  • Size: 16GB (2x8GB)
£106.90 £5.90 £112.80 Alza Buy
Storage
From parametric filter
  • Capacity: 480GB - 10TB
  • Type: SSD
  • Interface: SATA 6 Gb/s
  • Form Factor: 2.5"
£127.49 FREE £127.49 Amazon UK Buy
From parametric filter
  • Capacity: 3TB - 10TB
  • Type: 7200RPM
  • Interface: SATA 6 Gb/s
  • Form Factor: 3.5"
£73.70 £73.70 Eclipse Computers Buy
Video Card
From parametric filter
  • Chipset: GeForce GTX 1070
£379.97 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime £379.97 Amazon UK Buy
Case £72.00 £72.00 Aria PC Buy
Power Supply £67.61 £67.61 Amazon UK Buy
Base Total: £1231.25
Shipping: £5.90
Total: £1237.15
* Using your selected merchants and only including nearby in-store pickup prices)
* Some physical dimension restrictions cannot (yet) be automatically checked, such as cpu cooler / RAM clearance with modules using tall heat spreaders.

Comments Sorted by:

LemonComputers 5 points 10 months ago

To cool the i5-6600k while overclocking we selected the Corsair H100i v2. The updated version of the original H100i is an excellent choice for our build and will keep the temperature of the CPU cool while overclocking.

Water cooling is excellent for overclocking but there are many air coolers out there that can handle overclocking.

clairelaliberte 1 point 10 months ago

Do you think the Cryorig H7 will do well?

LemonComputers 2 points 10 months ago

Yes. It's a great air cooler and is compatible with this build.

TORAFTMarRenZ 0 points 10 months ago

Is the popular Cooler Master 212 Evo okay?

mkwe 1 point 10 months ago

nooooo idk why that one is so popular but no

Semper-Aethereum 5 points 10 months ago

It is just popular for its price. It is a good budget Air Cooler. However, with the price point of the H7 and the C7 approaching $30, the 212 Evo might be made less popular.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes, but not as good cooling performance as the Corsair H100i v2 water cooler used in this build guide.

CryWolf1218 1 point 10 months ago

Hey man currently building my first pc and have a question installing the liquid cooling, are you on by any chance?

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

No it is not. The H7 is actually very good CPU cooler. When looking at customer reviews there will always be some lemons or people that receive under performing products. As well as bad reviews from angry competitors.

[comment deleted]
tomtomj2 8 Builds 2 points 10 months ago

I like it, good PC for 1440P and some 4K gaming. One thing I'd recommend is the Arctic Liquid Freezer 240 over any other 240 mm AIO, it's $20 cheaper and much better.

gorkti200 2 Builds 3 points 10 months ago

Arctic Liquid Freezer, hooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!

LemonComputers 2 points 10 months ago

One thing I'd recommend is the Arctic Liquid Freezer 240 over any other 240 mm AIO, it's $20 cheaper and much better.

Why? Not disagreeing or anything, just want to know the reason.

jackthewhack3 1 point 10 months ago

What monitor do you recommend pairing with this build?

MrXanthios 1 point 10 months ago

I think the aoc g2460pqu is a good choice, low price, still it's a 144hz 1 ms display. I also saw aoc displays being used at a battlefield 4 lan tournament and I was very surprised how they look good.

SirMints 2 Builds 1 point 10 months ago

This is nearly identical to my recent build in terms of parts and specs.

A note to anyone out there looking at the Corsair 400C: It's a great case and I absolutely love the swing of the window and how it closes. It's pretty sleek and the power button has a nice click to it too. All that said, the PSU enclosure is a total pain in the butt. Removing and installing it requires some finicky angles and I ended up ditching half of it entirely (and the HDD enclosure it hid). But the two fans it comes with are a nice touch that make up for the $100 price point on it.

spankthatdill 1 point 9 months ago

Do you have any suggestions for a better case? I'm looking at pretty much buying this specific build somewhat soon and would like to save on some hassle if possible since I'm a complete beginner. I am handy with tools though so if it's just a mechanical issue then that's no problem for me really.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Why do you want a better case? This build guide has quite a good case.

SirMints 2 Builds 1 point 9 months ago

That plastic PSU cover, specifically the back portion that rests beneath your motherboard, is a very tight squeeze. You have to line everything up "just so" to get the thing to click in. You'll probably be afraid you're getting way too close to your mobo, but taking your time will make it work out.

As a bonus. The door panel will be a big help when you want to get in and make any adjustments as you're learning more. Or to marvel at what you just accomplished.

I'd say go for it if you like the looks, there are plenty of worse choices out there and I'm sure only a few that are better at that price. It's a good-sized mid-tower and the two fans add good value.

fiasco71 1 point 10 months ago

Hi,

You mention SLI but will this power supply be enough for SLI? From what I understand you need at least 650w so a 700w unit to play it safe.

Please correct me if i am wrong.

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 10 months ago

The guides are a starting point. If you want SLI/CF the build only requires small tweaks. Depending on your GPUs you may need to bump up the PSU size.

fiasco71 1 point 10 months ago

Hi ,

thanks for reply, I asked because I am currently putting together a 1070 rig, and most z170 mb's support sli so thought may as well plan build for this possibility, hence dual sli 1070 require nearly 600w. So wise to get an adequate psu straight off.

GentlemanShark 1 Build 1 point 10 months ago

They will only draw about 180 max though.

Thagrosh 1 point 10 months ago

Thanks for the guide! Are there any recommended white cases that would go with this?

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Corsair Carbide 400C White

It's the same case except that it's white.

LonghornAlamo2040 1 point 10 months ago

I've researched all these parts.

I would personally build with these parts! +1

Gwilbur34 1 point 10 months ago

Best thing about this build is the 1070, really like the 480gb SSD. seems like a really solid gaming build. Nice job!

Filthy_McNasty 1 point 10 months ago

What kind of cooling are you using for the parametric filters?

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 10 months ago

There is no parametric on the CPU cooler.

Filthy_McNasty 1 point 10 months ago

Story of my life! I wonder if a 2nd-hand Retroencabulator can fill the void.

Filthy_McNasty 1 point 10 months ago

And I wasn't referring to the CPU cooler

LemonComputers 0 points 10 months ago

What?

Filthy_McNasty 1 point 10 months ago

You're right. I should go with a brand new one.

GentlemanShark 1 Build 1 point 10 months ago

GG. Played him.

KagimaUchiha 1 point 10 months ago

Is this PC good? I am looking for a custom PC around this price that can run GTA-V any graphics at 50-80 fps, should I get it??? Will it be enough to do that?

windroidian 1 point 10 months ago

This build is more than enough to achieve 50-80 fps with GTA-V on most monitors. What resolution is your monitor (or what would you like it to be)? Anything under 4K will definitely get over 50, if you go all the way down to 1080p (pretty standard), you'll likely be rocking significantly over 100fps even on ultra settings.

LonghornAlamo2040 1 point 10 months ago

To add to my initial comment, Corsair's Force LE 480GB is the only value SSD I would get in spite of my high favor for Samsung's 850's and M.2 950 which I'm using right now.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Why?

LonghornAlamo2040 1 point 10 months ago

I meant to say, that it would be my budget choice if a high performance SSD was not available to me. Unfortunately we can no longer edit our posts as I have just learned. :(

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Unfortunately we can no longer edit our posts as I have just learned. :(

That's because your comment is over an hour old.

LonghornAlamo2040 1 point 10 months ago

Must have been a recent change, used to be limited to within 24 hours or something.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Nope, it's been like that for a long time as far as I know.

BanksGaming 1 point 10 months ago

Love the build!

ultimategamerxp 1 point 10 months ago

Do i really need both the SSD and the Internal HD couldn't i just remove the SSD from the build and use the Internal Hard-drive, If i were to do that what would be the consequences and benefits

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes. The build would work just fine without the SSD or without the HDD, but if you remove the SSD then it won't boot or load as fast.

womped 1 point 10 months ago

I used this guide as the foundation for my first build in a very, very long time. I'd like to get a robust gaming machine, that will be able max out current AAA titels and will be futureproof for a few years. I'll also do some coding (c#, python), a little blender and maybe a some photo editing every once in a while. Currently I'm not looking to overclock the thing, but since it seems it's not making much of a difference, I'd like to keep that option open for the future.

Here are the changes I made:

To me, this seems like it's just some minor changes, but since I changed the case and the CPU cooler, I'm not sure if it still fits (mechanically). I'd guess the different brand of the GeForce should not have any impact at all?

Are there any possible improvements on my build or anything else I need to keep in mind?

Here's the complete build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor €238.21 @ Amazon Deutschland
CPU Cooler Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler €70.54 @ Amazon Deutschland
Motherboard *ASRock Fatal1ty Z170 Gaming K4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard €124.54 @ Mindfactory
Memory *Crucial 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory €63.58 @ Amazon Deutschland
Storage *Sandisk SSD PLUS 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive €109.56 @ Amazon Deutschland
Storage *Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive €96.84 @ Mindfactory
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card €451.62 @ Mindfactory
Case Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case €87.83 @ Mindfactory
Power Supply *SeaSonic G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply €92.74 @ Mindfactory
Monitor ViewSonic XG2401 23.6" 144Hz Monitor €299.90 @ Amazon Deutschland
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total €1635.36
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-09-16 13:36 CEST+0200
manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 3 points 10 months ago

I wouldn't get a freesync monitor with an nvidia gpu. Either go with gsync or swap to AMD GPU(s). Everything else looks good!

LemonComputers 3 points 10 months ago

^ This

FreeSync only works on AMD cards and G-Sync only works on NVIDIA cards, therefore there's no point in having a FreeSync monitor with a NVIDIA card or a G-Sync monitor with an AMD card.

womped 1 point 10 months ago

Thank you both for the hint about the monitor. Is there a specific monitor you would recommend?

LemonComputers 2 points 10 months ago

What's your budget for a monitor?

womped 1 point 10 months ago

The
ViewSonic XG2401 23.6" 144Hz Monitor
would have been around 300€, so that's about the amount I wanted to invest. But as far as I've seen the G-Sync Monitors seem to be a little more expensive. So I'd say 300€ would be great, my maximum would be about 450€ to 500€. Is it possible to get a decent Monitor for my build in that price range?

womped 1 point 10 months ago

It seems the G-Sync Monitors are going to be more expensive than i thought. I was checking with the Monitor Comparison Chart and narrowed it down to the Dell S2417DG (or even the Dell S2716DG?). That Monitor is about 520€ - that's a lot of money...

asuka69 1 point 10 months ago

Would this build go good with this monitor ?

Asus PB287Q 28" 4K 60Hz UHD HDMI Monitor

asuka69 1 point 10 months ago

answer this pl0x ^

here is the monitor does it go good with this build?

http://www.ebuyer.com/639060-asus-pb287q-28-4k-60hz-uhd-hdmi-monitor-pb287q

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes.

jnom 1 point 10 months ago

Would this build do well with a larger screen like this one?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA4JH3H01432

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 10 months ago

Without issue.

ultimategamerxp 1 point 10 months ago

Could I just not get the SSD and the Hard Drive from this build and just use my Hard Drive from my current PC that i use with windows already installed on it ?

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes, but you will only be able to legally transfer the Windows license from the old motherboard to the new motherboard if it is not OEM.

IAEInferno 1 point 10 months ago

What should I put inside the 480 GB ssd?

LemonComputers 2 points 10 months ago

Your operating system and other frequently used system files, and if you have spare capacity, a few frequently used programs and/or games.

IAEInferno 1 point 10 months ago

Thanks lemon!

GentlemanShark 1 Build 2 points 10 months ago

OS, most used programs, favorite games, anything that you want to load fast!

JoshWMoore 1 point 10 months ago

I an new to building computers, and I was wondering about something..

I have seen other builds for a pretty similar price, (~1200-1300) but had instead incorporated an i7 6700k and a GTX 1080. It seems that the reason why they can still be close in price, while one having a more powerful cpu and gpu were that this one seems to be a bit more fleshed out, and have the "extras" like an ssd, 3tb of HDD space, a more expensive case, and a water cooler. (The price is more spread out among the parts, instead of an expensive CPU and GPU and cheap (while still good) other parts.)

Which do you think would do better? The one here with the "extras" or the more powerful central components?

(If you don't know what I mean, look at a build like this:)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-6700K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor $296.06 @ Jet
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $24.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus Z170-A ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $144.82 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2800 Memory $35.98 @ Newegg
Storage Western Digital Caviar Green 1TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive $45.59 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1080 8GB G1 Gaming Video Card $590.28 @ Jet
Case Corsair SPEC-03 Red ATX Mid Tower Case $66.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G2 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $91.17 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1305.76
Mail-in rebates -$10.00
Total $1295.76
Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-09-18 15:58 EDT-0400
LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

The i5-6600K and GTX 1070 are very good, powerful components even if they're not the highest end components. At the same time you do want an SSD as that will provide a great performance increase, so I would go for the extras over the core components. I would not get the WD Caviar Green as you could get the much faster 7200 RPM WD Blue for roughly the same price. Everything else looks good to me.

oa1234 1 point 10 months ago

Can someone please look at my build, its my first time building a gaming pc so i wanted someone with experience to take a look and see if its any good. http://pcpartpicker.com/list/BTrZJV

GentlemanShark 1 Build 3 points 10 months ago

Wrong place to post

ultimategamerxp 1 point 10 months ago

I want to use something that isnt the liquid cooling, does anyone else know any CPU Coolers that isnt liquid colling that would work with this build

GentlemanShark 1 Build 1 point 10 months ago

How much do you want to spend/overclock?

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Why not liquid cooling?

Anyways, what's your budget?

GentlemanShark 1 Build 1 point 10 months ago

I've heard that SSD is pretty bad, but it should be okay just for frequently used storage and OS.

[comment deleted by staff]
GabeB37 1 point 10 months ago

Would this build be compatible with this case? : NZXT Phantom 820 (White)

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes.

SylentStryke 1 point 10 months ago

Noob here thinking about following this build for my very first gaming desktop. I don't know how practical this would be but I was wondering if it would be possible for the person who made this build or some other awesome person to make a video of them setting up their rig after getting all the parts for this build. I know this is asking a lot for a step by step build but thought i'd try and ask anyways, if not no worries.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

PCPP staff have done that for several of the build guides here, but I am not aware of such a thing for this particular build, at least the latest version.

SylentStryke 1 point 10 months ago

I'll look into the other videos thanks for the info

Kingofstudents 1 point 10 months ago

I miss good old pcpartpocker

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

With the community build guides?

Kingofstudents 1 point 9 months ago

Ya and just how busy it was

xayxa30 1 Build 1 point 10 months ago

This is a nice build, as I have something in the works comparable to this. My only biggest gripe is the 400c case where the HDD storage goes. It is difficult to put two Internal 3.5" Drives in the bays as the SATA power cables ( and SATA data as well) are right on top of each other. For data you need the straight cables (not angled) as I even accidentally snapped off the head connector as it was too tight.

The SATA power connector head is tight as it is needs to be angled to provide power to both drives. I am debating whether to keep as is or go some other route. I'm afraid the SATA powercables are being stressed at such an angle and over time will stress the HD connector build. Any thougths? Perhaps you can put another 3.5 in there to test ....

MikeWantsPCs 1 point 10 months ago

Hi there , this is a lovely build!

With the exact same parts, do you think this mean machine could handle 2 Monitors ?

If yes, do you think i'd have to upgrade for a stronger PSU?

[comment deleted by staff]
MikeWantsPCs 1 point 9 months ago

Thank you for your reply :)

hurricanehugo57 1 point 10 months ago

I'm looking to build my first gaming PC. I need it to be able to record/stream console games as well as games like H1Z1. I'm also might be doing some video editing on the pc. Is this the build for me? I really appreciate any advise!

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes, except that I'd change the Silicon Power SSD to something higher quality.

hurricanehugo57 1 point 10 months ago

Thanks for responding! Ok. Is there something you'd recommend? And you don't think I'd need to upgrade the CPU to an i7?

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Depends on your budget for an SSD.

hurricanehugo57 1 point 10 months ago

I wouldn't go too much high budget wise for the SSD. I'm just worry about the CPU when it comes to doing recordings and editing.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

The i5-6600K is a great processor and you should only need an i7 if you're doing heavy recording and editing.

mckamike 1 point 10 months ago

Great build

Keatononame 1 point 10 months ago

Nothing special about this, just a solid all-around mid-level rig.

Gladvin 1 point 10 months ago

If I changed the GTX 1070 to the 1080 and the Intel Core i5 to the i7 will I need to change any specs? Since I know that not everything is compatible with certain things.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Depends on the specific video card.

deox13 1 point 10 months ago

I want to get into PC gaming but i dont know anything about pcs would this be able to run paragon at ultra and other triple a titles? like fall out 4 with mods to increase the graphics ? :D

Hoedizzle33 1 point 9 months ago

Is there anyway you can order all these parts or list them from the same website? Say newegg? It seems like it would save on shipping or just ease of order if somthing were to go wrong.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

If all of the parts are available at such retailer, yes.

SNiPpy_YiPpy 1 point 9 months ago

Does the NZXT H440 (Matte Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case fit with this build?

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Yes.

[comment deleted]
Cicero_ 2 Builds 1 point 9 months ago

I would go with the Corsair 460x. It's only $20 more and it looks so much nicer. I know it's not out yet but if somebody wants to wait a little while for a cool looking case I think the 460x is perfect.

vistastructions 1 point 9 months ago

I would not go with a huge 3tb hard drive; instead I think 1tb-2tb is enough for most people. In addition, I would change out the 400C with a mid tower case to save some money; I use the Rosewill REDBONE U3 for a lot of my builds. You can mount the H100i on the side panel. I would also consider a mATX board since chances are you're not going to expand GPU's.

IMO I think most of the builds featured so far have been kind of overblown in terms of price. Correct me if I'm wrong.

[comment deleted]
vistastructions 1 point 9 months ago

Oh wait, lol you're right, my bad... but I think there are mATX's with SLI support. They may be cheaper.

CommanderT1562 1 point 9 months ago

I used everything in this build, except I upgraded the power supply to the 750W model, and I am using an EVGA GeForce GTX 970 SSC ACX 2.0 4GB graphics card instead.

I didn't have much trouble with the installation, the hardest thing in my opinion was getting the freaking screws to line up correctly on the dual radiator (pain in the neck). Also to get the radiator to fit into the case without hitting the RAM, you need to install it on the front panel of the case, not the top... i figured that out once it was all set up and wasted about 20 minutes.

I don't know how many of you use userbenchmark (great site), but I did 2 runs of the computer to test. First run (no overclock on cpu): http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/1735027 Second run (with asus performance preset from BIOS): http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/1750669

Hope this helps guys. Installation took roughly 2 and a half hours but it was worth it. Thanks for the great build!

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

I didn't have much trouble with the installation, the hardest thing in my opinion was getting the freaking screws to line up correctly on the dual radiator (pain in the neck).

In the future, I would recommend using a magnetized screwdriver to avoid issues like this.

Gladvin 1 point 9 months ago

What will I need to change if I use the GTX 1080 instead of the 1070.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Which specific GTX 1080?

qqwtf 1 point 9 months ago

Please stop changing the parts list, it changes every day and I don't know why

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 3 points 9 months ago

Parametric selections, like the ones used in this build will adjust automatically to the lowest priced product available given their respective filters.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Many of the parts in this build guide are on a parametric filter, which will automatically select the least expensive part in the filter. Since prices are constantly fluctuating and the parametric filter automatically selects the least expensive part in real time, the parts are changing almost daily.

[comment deleted]
qqwtf 1 point 9 months ago

Would this list be okay then? It is based on some of the past parts, only change being the memory because it wasn't previously sold by any of the vendors. http://pcpartpicker.com/list/jwyZcc

(OS, monitor, and mouse add to price there)

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Looks good except I'd change the Silicon Power SSD to something higher quality.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
Jbraz94 1 point 9 months ago

Hey, Im building my first computer. This is what I have so far. Would you mind telling me what you think and if you have any thoughts or suggestions. Thanks so much!

http://pcpartpicker.com/list/TjfRVY

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Everything looks good except you could get a better performing Cryorig H7 for only a little bit more.

Jbraz94 1 point 9 months ago

Thanks! Appreciate it!

YaBoiJohnny 1 point 9 months ago

I really am thinking about setting up this build in the next couple months but what I am really perplexed about is the monitor. For my budget, right now is $250 for a monitor but then I would upgrade later. Does anyone have any suggestions for a temporary monitor for this build that is decent for my budget? Thanks in advance!

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Temporary monitor?

YaBoiJohnny 1 point 9 months ago

Like a monitor id use for like 5-6months within my budget before I can upgrade to a better one.

YaBoiJohnny 1 point 9 months ago

Also, is an optical drive necessary to install a operating system for this build?

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

No. You can purchase a USB Windows license or download Windows and insert it on your own USB drive.

[comment deleted]
Trav_X 1 point 9 months ago

Switch 480gb for a 240, switch 3TB with a 2TB or even 1TB, and you'll be saving quite a bit of money unless you need literally 3.5 terabytes of storage. Personally, I don't think one needs that much unless you want ALL of your games and more.

starforceone 1 point 9 months ago

I prefer Samsung SSDs compared to Adata, I also prefer Western Digital Hard Drives and I'm willing to pay a premium for better caching and performance over Hitachi. I would have used the GTX 1060 instead of the 1070 you'll still get a great gaming experience even at higher resolutions, I also prefer G.Skill or Corsair RAM over any other brand and LemonComputers is correct, even the Hyper 212 Evo air cooler could handle overclocking with the 6600k. Having said all that, these are just minor personal opinions and this is still a good gaming build.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

I also prefer Western Digital Hard Drives and I'm willing to pay a premium for better caching and performance over Hitachi.

The Western Digital HDDs have better performance than the Hitachi/HGST HDDs, however, the HGST hard drives are not bad and are still relevant and in many cases good choices.

I would have used the GTX 1060 instead of the 1070 you'll still get a great gaming experience even at higher resolutions,

I believe that the Excellent Gaming Build is one of the higher end build guides. Plus, unlike the GTX 1060, the GTX 1070 supports SLI and therefore has better upgrade support.

I also prefer G.Skill or Corsair RAM over any other brand

Why? G.Skill and Corsair are good RAM brands but they're not the only good ones out there.

starforceone 1 point 9 months ago

Unless you're gaming in resolutions higher than 1080p or you have a multi-monitor setups then SLI is usually not needed. All you need is a single mid to high end card and the 1060 is perfect it can even handle GTA V on high settings, since games like GTA V and Battlefield are CPU intensive it would make more sense to upgrade your processor before your GPU. Once you go SLI you will consume more power and need to spend more money on a higher end PSU. A single more powerful GPU is usually better than SLI.

Hitachi drives are good but they're slower than other drives in the same class, and Western Digital Caviar Blue drives are not that expensive. I have a Western Digital 2TB Black Series drive and a 250gb Samsung 850 Evo as my boot drive and I am very satisfied with it since I don't have a large library of games I only play GTA V, Elite Dangerous and Skyrim.

As for the memory, I prefer G.Skill and Corsair for the aesthetics and the reliability. Also because I've only built a couple PCs and I haven't had the chance to use other brands, I don't see any reason to use other brands at this point.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

OK, makes sense.

HorseMouth 1 point 9 months ago

Being a complete newby is it possible to fit a soundcard to this build. I want to use it for gaming and an internet radio station. If its doable would you be able to recomend a soundcard for it. Also if you think theres anything else i will need to add could you let me know. tons of thanks for the site and any help i can get :-)

supawichza400 1 point 9 months ago

I just change some hardware like cpu because i want the i7 instead of i5 but is it still going to work ok with this. Also is this come with sound card Any problem with this list

https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/user/supawichza400/saved/ Thank you I am quite new at this

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

I just change some hardware like cpu because i want the i7 instead of i5 but is it still going to work ok with this.

While i7's are very good processors, keep in mind that i5's are almost as good in terms of performance, so you should only need an i7 for heavy usage tasks.

Any problem with this list

Not really other than the Silicon Power SSD (which I'd replace with something better quality) and the generic name.

supawichza400 1 point 9 months ago

I made some minimum change after your comment and recommend. Is theses hardware going to be alright including the case, is there going to be any problem? https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/user/supawichza400/saved/#view=FF4CJx

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

The parts should be compatible with the case.

P.S. You can use the "Reply" button under other's comments so that they're notified of responses. In this case I'm subscribed to the build guide comments so I see every comment in my inbox, but this is often not the situation for others.

HorseMouth 1 point 9 months ago

Being a complete newby is it possible to fit a soundcard to this build. I want to use it for gaming and an internet radio station. If its doable would you be able to recomend a soundcard for it. Also if you think theres anything else i will need to add could you let me know. tons of thanks for the site and any help i can get :-)

Arix14 1 point 9 months ago

What's the SAFE overclocking limit for this CPU?

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Overclocking depends on the specific CPU serial as different CPUs of the same model are binned differently and therefore some can overclock farther than others. While it is indeed possible to have a stable system while running a voltage-increase overclock, a "stable overclock" is an overclock that increases the clock speed without increasing the voltage.

HeXicSGm 1 point 9 months ago
LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Yes.

[comment deleted]
Dank_Doritos 1 point 9 months ago

I'm wondering if this build will last me a long time, and be able to play 1440p/1080p max settings: http://pcpartpicker.com/list/nYpPJV I would appreciate some criticism! :)

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Yep, looks like a nice build, except that the sleeve bearing fan on the CPU cooler may not exactly last a "long time". A ball bearing or even FDB fan would be good.

Dank_Doritos 1 point 9 months ago

Alright thanks, but I think I'm gonna cut down the GTX 1070 to a RX 480 and use Freesync instead, because I was going a little ahead of myself :) But thank you for the reply! :D Also, would you be able to recommend a good, bang for the buck ball bearing fan? I'm still quite new to these things :)

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Why do you want FreeSync over G-Sync? Cheaper?

Dank_Doritos 1 point 9 months ago

Not only that, but like I said, I will be using an RX 480 instead, because I realized that the price would be too high for me. BTW I live in Sweden, so the prices are kinda ********.

[comment deleted]
JCurl44 1 point 9 months ago

you only need the Corsair H100i if you are gonna overclock right? This is my first build and I tweaked this one a little bit and I don't think i would overclock at this point. Maybe at a later time

LemonComputers 2 points 9 months ago

You don't need its level of cooling performance for this kind of build but water cooling is still nice and the Corsair H100i v2 water cooler used in this build guide is definitely one of the better ones.

jacobma 1 point 9 months ago

Sorry noob question, this is my first time building a pc and I'm just wondering why you selected palit brand for the graphics card out of all the different options ? any specific reason?

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

I'm just wondering why you selected palit brand for the graphics card out of all the different options ?

...I see a Zotac brand video card in the build guide, not Palit.

jacobma 1 point 9 months ago

ooo the one thats popping up on my screen is : Palit GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Dual Video Card

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Try refreshing your screen...the Zotac probably became cheaper between when you commented and when I commented, which would cause the parametric filter to automatically readjust its selection. Or you could be in a different country.

jacobma 1 point 9 months ago

Ooo I'm in the UK. So out of all the different bands why did you think he/she picked the Zotac brand ? becauses its the cheapest ?

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

becauses its the cheapest ?

Yes. The parametric filter will automatically select the least expensive part within the criteria that is compatible (according to the compatibility checker).

[comment deleted]
manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 9 months ago

The GPU is on a parametric filter and automatically selects the lowest priced option within the constraints.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Why parametric it though? Isn't this supposed to be a high end build?

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 9 months ago

The parametric is based on the filters supplied. All 1070/1080 OC and perform roughly the same. The only big difference is the noise from the cooler.

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Sure. That makes sense, but aren't there some that are better than others in sometimes significant ways? For example Founder's Edition versus aftermarket / AIB cards? Just wondering.

iamprobablynotsimon 1 point 9 months ago

would the video card support, say, vr?

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 9 months ago

Yep, without issue.

iamprobablynotsimon 1 point 9 months ago

thanks. one more question, i've seen some negative reviews on the mini 1070, does the mini lose anything as compared to the regular 1070?

LemonComputers 1 point 9 months ago

Should.

213teenager 2 Builds 0 points 10 months ago

I say this build wasted lots of money. But people could always find cheaper deals (or different specs) right?

manirelli staff submitter 8 Builds 1 point 10 months ago

Where do you believe money was wasted?

Ultimate_Me 1 point 10 months ago

I have this build, http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Ultimate_Me/saved/2rYJxr . Wouldn't this be able to run games just as well as your build, but at a lower price? ( I know it has a lot less storage, but I don't need too much anyways)

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Yes, if anything, maybe slightly better.

213teenager 2 Builds 0 points 10 months ago

Cooler is a complete waste(just my opinion), for motherboard get MSI z170a pro(cheaper!?), better price/performance hdd brands(there is enough money to buy 2 2tbs), case(if you don't want led for looks), the power supply(although it saves future spending)

LemonComputers 4 points 10 months ago

Cooler is a complete waste(just my opinion),

Why? The Corsair H100i v2 is actually an excellent choice for a CPU cooler.

for motherboard get MSI z170a pro(cheaper!?),

Perhaps.

better price/performance hdd brands(hitachi for example),

What's wrong with the current HDD? It actually looks less expensive than competing HDDs from Hitachi/HGST or Western Digital of the same capacity.

case(if you don't want led for looks),

I like the case. What do you not like about it?

the power supply(although it saves future spending)

The SeaSonic G series is an excellent choice for a budget power supply. It's high quality and isn't very expensive. The power supply is arguably the most important part of your computer and should never be cheaped out or skimped on.

MjolnirThunder 3 points 10 months ago

Seconding the power supply statement, I'd rather scrape up extra coin for a reliable PSU upfront rather than deal with replacing the entire build later because a low quality one fried everything.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Exactly. Couldn't agree more.

213teenager 2 Builds -1 points 10 months ago

You want a gaming machine, there is many other choices for looks, not 100 bucks on case, and just like you said, overclocking to the maximum is still overkill with a liquid cooler, for example, noctua, superior brand, I recommend a range from u12s to d14 dual. Toshiba is unreliable with personal experience as I had several before. What future spending is about not wasting electricity and higher quality is depended on the levels(bronze to titanium), since this is actually a pretty good price, I won't change it.

LemonComputers 4 points 10 months ago

You want a gaming machine, there is many other choices for looks, not 100 bucks on case, and just like you said,

There will always be plenty of choices with a gaming build. I don't see anything wrong with that. Everyone has different preferences and needs, and the build guides are only intended for the majority, not everyone. If this build guide doesn't fit your preferences, you can always create your own parts list or your own version of the build guide. Why? Because if the staff were to take Person A's suggestions, then Person B would come along and complain about the part choices influenced by Person A. Or any other similar situation for that matter. There isn't one build guide that suits everyone and you can't satisfy everyone with everything.

overclocking to the maximum is still overkill with a liquid cooler,

That doesn't make water cooling bad or unnecessary. Just because you can overclock without one doesn't mean that it goes without its benefits of aesthetics and superior cooling performance.

for example, noctua, superior brand, I recommend a range from u12s to d14 dual.

Can you provide data supporting your statement that Noctua is superior to Corsair please? Even Noctua's highest performing air coolers don't have the cooling performance of a water cooler.

Toshiba is unreliable with personal experience as I had several before.

Please provide data to back this up. Personal experience is a very very limited experience and you may have just received a lemon, or, perhaps abused or misused your drive. It happens with all companies and isn't going to stop - Seagate, Western Digital, Hitachi, Toshiba, what not.

What future spending is about not wasting electricity and higher quality is depended on the levels(bronze to titanium), since this is actually a pretty good price, I won't change it.

The 80 Plus certification levels - White, Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum, Titanium - are only a measurement of efficiency and are not in any way a measurement of quality. While a junk power supply like one of those from Logisys or Diablotek or any other junk PSU manufacturer is less likely to be certified...Just because PSU A is Titanium certified does not necessarily mean that it is higher quality than PSU B that is Gold certified. Yes it's possible that PSU A is better quality than PSU B, but not necessarily. For example, the EVGA SuperNOVA B2, G2, P2, and T2 power supplies are all of different efficiency levels and respective certification levels; however, in no way is the T2 superior quality to the G2 or the B2, and that's just one example.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

Thanks.

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

How so?

Isalon -1 points 10 months ago

Hello all, "amateur" here and I'm planning on buying a new rig within 30 days. I have questions about this build, especially when compared to the Enthusiast build.

Goals for my rig: Gaming: No video editing or anything commercial, straight up gaming. Longevity: I'd like something that I can purchase now for a fair price and be able to upgrade 3-5 years down the line. (If this isn't feasible within my budget range, I'd rather get something top of the line now that will last me as long as it can). Looking for the best bang-for-the-buck while being able to upgrade parts later - in that order of importance. Budget: Top is around 1500 but ideally I'd like less. The less, the better...but I know you get what you pay for. (See above, bang-for-my-buck reference.)

I have many questions, and hopefully some of you (much more intelligent than me) folks can help me out.

  1. I would assume that I don't need a HDD, and I can just go with a smaller SDD? I see most of these have a small ("small") SDD and massive ("massive") HDD. I would presume there's no requirement to having a HDD and a SDD is just fine? If so, why on builds like this would anyone put in a 3 TB (!!!!) HDD, and not just stick with the SDD? Heck, why not just bump the SDD up to 1 TB? I'm scratching my head why anyone would pay more money for a part that's so prone to going bad - I've been the victim of multiple HDD failures in the past. You can understand why I'd shy away from spending money on a part that I think will inevitably break anyway, especially when I can wipe an SDD and just put it in my next rig whereas a HDD becomes more prone to damage the more you screw with it. (Generalizing, I know.)

  2. I'm looking at this build and comparing it to the next step up, the Enthusiast build. I'm struggling to find a real difference - and justifying the potentially increased cost. Seems like the same CPU, GPU? RAM is similar? A little difference on other things but performance-wise, I mean...I'm looking for bang for my buck, and I'm not seeing where/how the Enthusiast build achieves that. Can someone tell me what I'm missing? For this question feel free to be technical in your response but what I'm really going to understand is talking is terms of processing power under load, FPS, response time, things I can wrap my head around. (Telling me XYZ is better because although you pay 100 bucks more you get 0.0001ms better response time doesn't help me much because I don't see/understand the value.)

  3. Regarding MOBO's. I've done a bit of research to re-educate myself. (Last time I built a PC I was a teenager and that was around Y2K.) Things have certainly changed. With the GPU, why are we choosing a MOBO that's got 64 GB RAM (when we really only need 16, so a 32 GB MOBO would be just fine?) and picking something with SLI when it's just a single GPU we're putting in? I feel I'm missing something here, but it feels like overkill?

I have more but I don't want to get carried away and they may be answered by whatever kind soul(s) choose to respond here. I apologize if this isn't the right place to post this question but I'm hoping it's a good place to start.

Thanks everyone!

MjolnirThunder 4 points 10 months ago

To answer your questions directly:

-Storage is completely user dependent - If you feel you'll only need ~500GB SSD space then that's all you need to get. If you feel you need more down the line you can pick up a HDD later. A common practice, and why there's a SSD and HDD listed here, is because many people use the former as a boot drive and the latter for general storage because HDDs are typically cheaper per GB than SSD; for half the price of the SSD listed in the guide I can get a HDD with twice the storage capacity. Again though, you do you, if you want to stick with a SSD then just do that.

-I'll agree with you, in my opinion the "Enthusiast" build uses that word lightly. I guess the main difference between the two is the GPU, going from a 1070 to a 1080 would set your foot further in the door for 4K gaming. This is largely opinion, but I feel someone in the enthusiast build would bump up to an i7 minimum, possibly crossing into 2011-3 chipsets to get access to processors with more cores. You stated that paying a premium for minimal gains doesn't make much sense to you, and largely I can agree, but at 4K resolutions every little boost helps - a 5FPS difference between 35-40 is much more noticeable than say 65-70.

-A lot of high quality mobos have room for upgrades that most will never use. They're still recommended though usually for their other features: more USB ports, more fan headers, more SATA connectors, better quality construction materials, things of the like. They do fall under the personal preference category to a degree; you obviously want to make sure it matches your processor's chipset as well as being compatible with whatever RAM you pick (DDR3 vs DDR4).

Hope it all helps, I'm no expert by any means.

Isalon 1 point 10 months ago

All of this was great and helpful information, thanks very much!

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

I would assume that I don't need a HDD, and I can just go with a smaller SDD? I see most of these have a small ("small") SDD and massive ("massive") HDD. I would presume there's no requirement to having a HDD and a SDD is just fine?

Yes. You can use just an SSD or just an HDD without problems.

If so, why on builds like this would anyone put in a 3 TB (!!!!) HDD, and not just stick with the SDD? Heck, why not just bump the SDD up to 1 TB?

Because large capacity, i.e. 1 TB, SSDs are very, very expensive. Sometimes upwards of $1000 when you could get an HDD for under $100.

I'm scratching my head why anyone would pay more money for a part that's so prone to going bad - I've been the victim of multiple HDD failures in the past. You can understand why I'd shy away from spending money on a part that I think will inevitably break anyway, especially when I can wipe an SDD and just put it in my next rig whereas a HDD becomes more prone to damage the more you screw with it. (Generalizing, I know.)

That's not true. HDDs have several reliability advantages over SSDs including read/write cycles and archival / data retention. Any HDD can fail, so can any SSD fail. HDDs are not "so prone to going bad" and personal experience is very limited and is a very small sampling size.

I'm looking at this build and comparing it to the next step up, the Enthusiast build. I'm struggling to find a real difference - and justifying the potentially increased cost. Seems like the same CPU, GPU? RAM is similar? A little difference on other things but performance-wise, I mean...I'm looking for bang for my buck, and I'm not seeing where/how the Enthusiast build achieves that. Can someone tell me what I'm missing? For this question feel free to be technical in your response but what I'm really going to understand is talking is terms of processing power under load, FPS, response time, things I can wrap my head around. (Telling me XYZ is better because although you pay 100 bucks more you get 0.0001ms better response time doesn't help me much because I don't see/understand the value.)

I think the Enthusiast Gaming Build has a different case and a few different parts. I can't give you the full answer because I don't know what's exactly behind all of the parts choices.

Regarding MOBO's. I've done a bit of research to re-educate myself. (Last time I built a PC I was a teenager and that was around Y2K.) Things have certainly changed. With the GPU, why are we choosing a MOBO that's got 64 GB RAM (when we really only need 16, so a 32 GB MOBO would be just fine?)

While you can use a motherboard that supports up to 64 GB of RAM with only 8 GB or whatever just fine, there is no need to. You only need the motherboard to support the amount of memory you're using. So, basically, if a motherboard supports more memory than you're using, that's no reason not to use that motherboard, but at the same time, there's no need to choose a motherboard because it supports a very high amount of RAM (more RAM than you'll use) unless you plan to upgrade in the future.

and picking something with SLI when it's just a single GPU we're putting in? I feel I'm missing something here, but it feels like overkill?

Yes, it's overkill and unnecessary, but a perfectly ok thing to do.

Matthew83 2 points 10 months ago

The difference in price between the z mobos with sli and without sli is like 30 dollars, so you might as well get the sli version, even if you never plan to use it, who knows, one day you might, and you won't need to upgrade your motherboard.

Isalon 1 point 10 months ago

I was actually hoping you'd respond because I see a lot of your replies in comments as pretty middle-of-the-line, matter-of-fact'ish.

I only need maybe 500GB on an SSD, I even have a 256GB SSD that I was considering using but that's borderline "too small" and I'm wondering if it's worth it to pony up a little extra for a new SSD and continue to keep this smaller one as my backup. I don't download much, my rigs are purely for gaming and when I get bored of a game I uninstall it and if I want to play it again later I'll reinstall it. So I only keep a small number of games on hand.

The HDD issue for me (I know small sample size/personal experience) is I've had so many HDD's crash because they're moving parts. I've had a lot of laptops over the years - and I know desktops aren't as vulnerable - but I can't get past a failing HDD. I'm immediately out a decent chunk of change for a repair cost whereas an SSD can fail but has a much smaller probability. Again, this is just my personal opinion, but I know where you're coming from on the SDD vs HDD argument and with regards to statistics.

Thanks for the information. If I have more questions do you mind if I ask you?

LemonComputers 2 points 10 months ago

I only need maybe 500GB on an SSD, I even have a 256GB SSD that I was considering using but that's borderline "too small" and I'm wondering if it's worth it to pony up a little extra for a new SSD and continue to keep this smaller one as my backup. I don't download much, my rigs are purely for gaming and when I get bored of a game I uninstall it and if I want to play it again later I'll reinstall it. So I only keep a small number of games on hand.

Yeah, sounds like a good plan.

The HDD issue for me (I know small sample size/personal experience) is I've had so many HDD's crash because they're moving parts.

SSDs do not have any mechanical components, but there are still many many SSD failures and SSDs are in no way immune to failures. If your data is important you should have a solid backup plan.

I've had a lot of laptops over the years - and I know desktops aren't as vulnerable -

Laptops use 2.5" HDDs which are actually slightly more durable than 3.5" desktop HDDs; the illusion of desktop HDDs being more reliable/durable is only because they're generally abused less.

but I can't get past a failing HDD.

a) It may be the specific HDD that is junk, which doesn't represent all HDDs.
b) HDDs are not extremely prone to failures and any SSD can fail at any time for any reason.
c) SSDs actually have a higher risk of sudden, unexpected, catastrophic failure than HDDs. This means less warning.
d) In the event of a failure, an HDD can often be successfully recovered by a professional data recovery company. They can do head swaps, platter swaps, what not. At the same time, the most common failure of an SSD is the controller and the flash chips cannot be cut out and recovered. If the flash itself dies, the SSD is not mechanical and cannot be repaired easily (and is often completely impossible.)

I'm immediately out a decent chunk of change for a repair cost whereas an SSD can fail but has a much smaller probability.

In many situations, HDD data recovery can cost thousands, while SSD data recovery can cost many times that because SSDs are generally/usually harder to recover. SSDs have only an extremely small reliability difference, and if anything, HDDs should be used for reliability critical tasks. About 100% of the population has experienced an HDD failure while about 20% of the population has experienced an SSD failure - this has nothing to do with reliability (i.e. is irrelevant) and is irrelevant because less people use SSDs and therefore less are exposed to their failures.

Thanks for the information. If I have more questions do you mind if I ask you?

No problem.

Connor_The_Gamer -1 points 10 months ago

this is a good build, but i would probably get 32gb or even 64gb of ram in the future. nice build though!

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

32 GB would provide a very good upgrade path, 64 GB won't really be used in a very long time and by the time it's current all of your other parts will be obsolete.

Connor_The_Gamer 1 point 10 months ago

I agree. Staying consistent with the upgrades is good to know, but the reason why I decided to advise using 64gb of ram was because you could use the ram in the future without having to update gpus or any mambo jambo like that.

GentlemanShark 1 Build 2 points 10 months ago

But your CPU and even your RAM would be outdated long before 64 is ever used.

Connor_The_Gamer 0 points 10 months ago

True statement! However, I suggested it because its good to upgrade to 64GB because your computer would last longer, thanks to upgrades. CUSTOM COMPUTERS NEVER GO OBSOLETE!

GentlemanShark 1 Build 1 point 10 months ago

No, it wouldn't because the processor and RAM generation would be outdated long before the memory capacity. And your last statement is ********

LemonComputers 1 point 10 months ago

True statement! However, I suggested it because its good to upgrade to 64GB because your computer would last longer, thanks to upgrades.

By the time 64 GB is even closed to being used, the parts and even the RAM itself will be obsolete.

CUSTOM COMPUTERS NEVER GO OBSOLETE!

Myth. Custom computers become obsolete like any other computer.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
[comment deleted by staff]
rhali8 2 Builds 3 points 10 months ago

There is no competitor that AMD has to the GTX 1070. There is nothing wrong with the card either.

MjolnirThunder 3 points 10 months ago

The sweet thing about build guides is that they're just that: guides. If you want to throw an AMD card in then by all means go ahead. Just don't be upset if you can't find one with the same performance at the 1070's price point.

LemonComputers 2 points 10 months ago

No. The GTX 1070 happens to be a good choice for this build.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
Reason:
Note: Wattages are estimates only. Actual power draw may differ from listed values.
Component Estimated Wattage
Intel - Core i5-6600K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor 11W - 91W
Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler 10W - 15W
ASRock - Fatal1ty Z170 Gaming K4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard 17W - 70W
Kingston - ValueRAM 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory 11W - 11W
Kingston - A400 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive 2W - 10W
Toshiba - 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive 4W - 20W
Palit - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Dual Video Card 37W - 150W
Total: 92W - 367W