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Building a PC limbo

RezNow
  • 5 months ago

First off, when is the right time to buy and build?

Over the past few weeks/months I have been pushing myself to build the PC of my dreams all for under $2000. But the main complication I run into is the fact that I can make 50 different builds with each of them being better than the other for different reasons. For someone new to PC building this is highly pragmatic because I feel that for the amount that I want to invest in building my future PC, I should be objectively building something that Im CONFIDENT will be 1) future proof and 2) worth the money. The problem is I don't think you can have either of those due to fluctuating/dropping prices.

All of this pushes me to think that because we are on the verge/months away from the next round of GPUs being announced and subsequently released, that I am wasting money on any variation of a build I make today because tomorrow I could do it for hundreds cheaper.

Is the mindset to simply say f*** it, put your head in a hole, and enjoy the current software?

This is my first walk through the gates of PC gaming. Growing up as a slave to the next console, my decisions were made for me and my quality of gaming was static to what the current console generation was offering. With PC gaming always giving you hundreds of options, and just as many wrong ones, I find it difficult to pull the trigger on a build because the overwhelming fear of wasting money on something that will be outdated months after building.

Ultimately, I understand that options are wonderful for the consumer and that is the draw of PC gaming. But, like most of my fellow PC newcomers that are blindly throwing parts onto a list in the PCPP forums, it is daunting. I'm compelled to get my money's worth while at the same time future proofing the next rig that I have sitting on my desk for the upcoming 3-5 years.

All this to ask, again, when is the right time to invest in building a PC?

Lastly, thank you to all of the helpful individuals on PCPP from all over world that take the time to reach down from their towers of PC intelligence with empathetic hands to push our bottoms towards a rig that'll blow our socks off. I'm new to this community but am extremely grateful for the help I've received while hear.

Sorry for the rant. Peace be the journey.

Comments

  • 5 months ago
  • 2 points

to build the PC of my dreams

future proof

You can always dream of something better. The best hardware today will someday become obsolete. Period. Value of current hardware will depreciate. That's just how it goes.

worth the money

overwhelming fear of wasting money

I understand this all too well. Here's the thing though: if you always wait for something new, you will never build a computer. What do you want to do with it? What are you using now for it?

when is the right time

Now is actually a pretty good time. PSU prices are rising but good models are still in stock for reasonable amounts. New compelling CPUs probably won't be released until holiday 2020 with next series of Ryzen, or if Intel ever releases 10nm+ desktop parts. Current GPUs are available for good prices in the midrange sector, where RTX Super cards and the RX5700 XT both have their merits (NVENC encoder and playing with raytracing vs raw performance per dollar). RAM prices are very reasonable even for 2x8GB 3600 MT/s CAS 16 kits I like recommending for Ryzen series 3000. 1 TB Intel 660p brings solid everyday NVMe performance for under $100 or even 2TB under $200. New cases like the P400A bring RGB and mesh fronts for better thermals.

Now when is right for you? If you don't have a PC and you want a PC, now is as good a time as any. If you have a PC, how's the performance? Is it still doing what you want it to do? If so, maybe you do want to wait longer to stretch your dollar. Don't be afraid to say "I want better and I want it now" just because something may or may not be juuuust around the corner.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ B&H
Motherboard Asus TUF GAMING X570-PLUS (WI-FI) ATX AM4 Motherboard $184.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $99.99 @ Newegg
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $184.99 @ B&H
Video Card ASRock Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB Taichi X OC+ Video Card $449.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks Eclipse P400A Digital ATX Mid Tower Case $94.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $91.98 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.04 @ HP
Monitor LG 27GL83A-B 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz Monitor $379.99 @ Amazon
Keyboard Rosewill NEON K85 RGB BR Wired Gaming Keyboard $49.00 @ Walmart
Mouse Logitech G502 HERO Wired Optical Mouse $41.99 @ Amazon
Headphones Sennheiser GAME ZERO Black Headset $117.95 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2024.89
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $2004.89
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-19 16:25 EST-0500

Example of what you can get at about the $2k price point.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Appreciate the feedback friend..

After much debating and internal torment, I have decided on this build with maybe changing the PSU. Thoughts?

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Trident Z Neo 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $84.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8 GB BLACK GAMING Video Card $659.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT H510 Elite ATX Mid Tower Case $149.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair RMx (2018) 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $119.89 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1574.83
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $1554.83
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-19 17:21 EST-0500
  • 5 months ago
  • 2 points

You're going to match that with a nice 1440p or even ultrawide monitor, right? because it's way too much GPU for 1080p unless you're in competition.

I have no issues with the list, but I would add a CPU cooler to replace the stock cooler. (Which is OK, just that you can do better.) Arctic Freezer 34, beQuiet Pure Rock is the bracket I'd be looking at.

750 watts is more PSU than you need (550w is plenty and 650w for a bit of overkill). PSU pricing seems to bounce around so much though that I'd put off the final decision until buying day.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

If you don't want an Intel 660p (and those are fantastic drives for dirt cheap), I'd go with the Sabrent Rocket.

The RAM kit I'd drop the extra 15 bucks for the tighter timings (CAS 18 vs CAS 16) which could likely be tightened even further.

The Tomahawk Max is a great board.

The EVGA Black works if you are springing for a basic 2080 Super. You will want a decent monitor to take advantage, though, like a 1440p144Hz display.

I'm not a fan of the H510 Elite; it's terrible thermally and very expensive for what you get.

Corsair RMx is good but you don't need 750W. I usually recommend 650W since that's a size that can handle even the most power hungry gaming rigs (I'm glaring at you, overclocked Vega). There's a number of good options: Evga G1+/G2/G3, Seasonic Focus Plus or Ultra Prime (prices are weird right now), Bitfenix Whisper M, Corsair RMx, there's a few others too. Pick whatever is cheapest when you go to buy.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Future proofing is in the eye of the beholder. I had built a pc that lasted me 10 years, that was in dire need of an upgrade, moved to a g3258 z97 r240 setup. Lasted me a few years, played fallout 76 on win7 just fine. Enthusiast moved onto a ryzen 1400 ab350 board 1060. Much greater power. Stopped on an i59600k ace board 1070 setup. I feel this will hold well for some time as its able clock the cpu and ram very well. I've seen prices as low/lower on occasion than black friday deals. Just have to know what youre looking for and keep an eye out for prices. I have moved on from the am4 1400 to a 2700 fit right in with no problem on an ab350m board. 3200c14 ram. As far as future proofing, it cant be done unless youre satisfied with what you have until it just simply can't keep up anymore. I'm done after 3 years of thinking future proofing. What I have will be fine for a good 5-6 years. In my eyes. Good luck.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted by staff]
  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

And probably will be

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