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OEM vs retail

TheSingingCarrots

4 days ago

I know that retail can pretty much do anything you want for windows? But what about oem, I read somewhere that it was locked down to the hardware or something? Please shed some light on this

Comments

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

OEM copies of Windows were traditionally for one PC and only that PC ever. So tied to the hardware.

Full Retail allows you to install on one PC, but move that Windows Key to a completely different PC, as long as it is removed from the first. So ans many PC as you want over time, but just one at a time.

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

So oem means pretty much no upgrades at all?

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

You can upgrade most things, not sure about motherboard. I have upgraded cpu/gpu/drives/memory and sometimes it asks me to go to MS to verify but not had any issue with it yet. Never changed out a board with an oem license though. I have a sff PC over a few years I put the largest cpu, added a gpu, largest memory pack, cloned hdd to a ssd, and it still works great. There is nothing left to upgrade in it. I also replaced the failed dvd drive. That was bought as a renewed, so I assume its an oem license. In the past by the time you needed a new board due to technology, you needed new version of windows too. So maybe win10 will last forever but that has never happened before.

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Maybe?

pcdlbragain explained very well how OEM Windows is tied to the motherboard. The catch is that in recent history even motherboard swaps that worked. The Windows 10 user agreement, and the way the automated validation works have made the understanding of how OEM versions of Windows 10 work about as clear as mud.

My recommendation is to buy the full version so you know you are safe for any types of upgrades in the future.

  • 3 days ago
  • 1 point

Software updates to the OS YES, the same as any other W10 release.

The problem relies on a hardware perspective. OEM releases are mostly tied to the board.

You may solve the problem if you call Microsoft to deactivate your existing key to give you a new one.

But that may end up to be a hassle. ¯\(ツ)

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

OEM is tied to the motherboard. I did some reading on Microsoft site a while ago and their clarifications summary talked about it being that PC and if the OEM could not source an exact replacement motherboard (maybe no longer made etc.) then it was acceptable to change the motherboard etc. but might require calling microsoft to do all that. And since you are not an OEM then that call might not go in your favor depending on who you end up talking to and what mood they are in etc. It's just easier in many ways to get the retail version and not have the hassles, but if lowest cost is your primary motivation then OEM can work.

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