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Charging your mobile phone

MichelWeber

9 days ago

This is obviously for those who have mobile phones.

My routine is to plug it in each night when I go to sleep. It is also my alarm clock. If I am doing some heavy use of it during the like, GPS or something, then I'll end up charging it as needed. But, other than that, that is my routine.

What is your routine for charging your mobile phone?

I'm curious because someone told me a while ago that you shouldn't leave your phone plugged in once it hits 100% charge level. Well, how is one to do that when it is charging overnight? huh? how? huh? That's what I should have told him. :P

Comments

  • 9 days ago
  • 2 points

I'm curious because someone told me a while ago that you shouldn't leave your phone plugged in once it hits 100% charge level. Well, how is one to do that when it is charging overnight? huh? how? huh? That's what I should have told him. :P

My phone is usually plugged in all day at work. Five days a week, ~50 weeks a year. So it's spend a ton of time being plugged in at 100%. I've done this with multiple phones, brands, models. I haven't seen an issue.

Sometimes advice has merit. Sometimes advice once had merit but no longer does, and it's really hard to get the memo out. And sometimes it's just nonsense that sounded good and people keep perpetuating because, "better safe than sorry".

Sort of how everyone frets over static electricity destroying parts and people have been repeating it for decades, even though you've probably never talked to a person who's destroyed a party because of static electricity. Pretty much no one has. And no matter how obviously silly it becomes, people still repeat it anyway.

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

My buddy destroyed his laptop MoBo with an ESD. But, it was a Dell so...

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

Well Dell motherboards aren't special, or especially susceptible to static shock. And I'm a bit skeptical that was the actual cause and that it wasn't just defective anyway. There's always someone who's got an exception, but it doesn't make actually worrying over it any more worthwhile or rational.

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

The MoBo worked just fine before he decided to touch all over it.

And, with HBM sensitivity limits being projected to continue to decrease in favor of higher performance I don't think I would urge the reduction of HMB controls. I would actually urge the opposite as the circuits are likely to become more and more sensitive.

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

We'll see, at the moment I'm putting my chips on, "Rationalization for fussing over something that's hardly worth fussing over."

  • 8 days ago
  • 2 points

I try to shut it off entirely when charging, and generally charge it to 70-80% unless I know I'll be out for a while.

It's not healthy for the batteries to be overcharged, but this is not the main issue with currently-available technologies. Leaving a phone idle (for your alarm, perhaps) as it saps power from the battery and constantly recharges itself isn't amazing for the battery, especially if you're doing it every night for the phone's lifetime.

Whether or not it's important is up to you. I put a lot of thought into battery health since I strongly preferred phones with simple user-serviceable batteries, so I could just carry a spare around. However, good offerings of the sort are no longer as common as they used to be, so I have to plan on replacing my device should the battery falter. I also like to make my devices last as long as possible. If you replace your device frequently, the drop in the battery's capacity will generally not be that significant over its service life.

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

Also, even "non-serviceable" phones have battery kits ranging from 13-30 dollars. A little care and knowhow is required but usually worth it. Completely brought my s7 back to life.

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

True, but they're generally not practical for everyday-carry spare batteries.

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, certainly more cumbersome of a swap. Not something to do on the fly.

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

About the same as you all the way around. I think in the past during the times when there was "battery memory" (still not sure the science behind that). It might of been important. But i keep my phones from 2 to 3 years using the same methods as you and my battery life and health never seems to degrade. I have a Stylo 4, not a high cost phone. I had it for well over a year and rarely ever at all have to charge it during the day. Other than very high usage, like really high. I think modern phones have things to prevent over charging. But i am not sure, as i am not 100 percent on cell tech

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

I’m pretty sure for li ion battery’s that doesn’t apply but yeah I leave mine charging all pretty much every night

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

Main phone is one Plus 6T, the charger with that thing is ridiculously fast, from a couple of % to full battery in just a little bit over an hour. So usually I will rarely be in a situation I need to charge it over night, not that it would bother me if I had to. iPhone I will usually leave on charge as usually close to the end of its battery at end of day, but work phone so meh.

In regards to leaving things on charge all the time, some think there may be some merit, this site https://batteryuniversity.com/index.php/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries which is produced by Cadex who make battery analysers etc suggest taking the phone off charge when 100% is the way to go and some comments (article updated mid 2018 so may still have some merit)

  • Once your smartphone has reached 100 percent charge, it gets 'trickle charges' to keep it at 100 percent while plugged in. It keeps the battery in a high-stress, high-tension state, which wears down the chemistry within.

  • "Li-ion does not need to be fully charged, nor is it desirable to do so. In fact, it is better not to fully charge, because a high voltage stresses the battery" and wears it away in the long run.

Similarly apple with IOS 13 have a new feature in which it will analyse you patterns, so knows roughly when your asleep at which point it will hold charging the battery to 80% even if connected, then before you usually wake up, will allow the phone to charge to 100%. Imagine there may be some merit if they are going through this sort of process.

With that said not looked into battery tech in detail so meh.

  • 9 days ago
  • 1 point

Dont know much about phones, be honest here, despite my age and the rest of my generation i dont use my phone much, so i dont have to charge it daily. I maybe charge it 2-3 times a week depending on how much i use it either during lunch breaks or for calling/radio contacts during work for the most part. When i charge it i try not to overcharge it as with el cheapo phones like mine, overcharging it will actually hurt battery life ( my last phone had this problem ). So i charge it after work or bring a portable charger.

Right now its around 75% and i haven't charged it in 2 days.

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

I keep my phone plugged in all day if possible. For those situations when I’m out and about, I have a 20,000 mAh battery pack I got for Christmas

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