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ZFGeek
  • 10 months ago

Anyone familiar with any part of FIRST Robotics: First Lego League(FLL), First Tech Challenge(FTC, the program I'm in), or First Robotics Competition(FRC)? It is a robotics program for elementary through high school who are interested in STEM, with thousands of teams around the world. Each program is mostly based around building a robot(out of legos or real parts, depending on league) to complete challenges every year.

I am part of one such team(FTC), and its going to be an interesting year. Last year, our programmer left the team(graduated, actually), and me and another kid are taking over. I have lots of ideas, but I don't know exactly how to implement them yet. I have to finish the Udemy Java course I'm working through, then maybe I'll know.

Anyways, one of the ideas I haved is to make programming easier. I want the robot to know the field (10' x 10') as a grid, and be able to travel to any coordinate on the grid just by passing in the coordinate through an argument. So, it would save from having to measure out each distance, and have a separate line of code for each measured movement. It seems pretty complex, though, as it can't usually travel in a straight line, as there are obstacles.Also, trying to get the robot to remember its plcement on the grid would be challenging. I don't expect anyone of you to help, just showing one of the ideas I have.

Overall, the program is a lot of fun. I'm not sure why I wrote this detailed explaination, I guess I thought it'd be interesting to some of you. Thanks for reading! ;)

Comments

  • 10 months ago
  • 5 points

I thought this topic was going to be about something completely different.

Anyway, I believe in you, man. You’ll do fine.

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Ah, a fellow FTC member. greetings from the easternmost state

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

What team are you on? I'm on Team 8645, Robotic Doges.

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

Team 12374, alchemy.

  • 9 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice! Well, good luck this upcoming season!

  • 9 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks, good luck to you as well!

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Wow. Didn't really have to worry about digitally mapping the playing field when I was in FIRST ('98-'01). We manually controlled the movement from the team stations with a pair of joysticks like a tank. One year we actually put KittyKat snowmobile treads on the bot. Slowest thing out there but we could push anyone or anything out of the way if necessary. Good times. Enjoy it, ZFGeek!

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm not very well versed in this, but it sounds prerty nuanced. Do you want it to decide its route to the entered coordinate while avoiding obstacles in encounters? Seems like the dillema's Tesla's been working on.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

yeah, k ind of. I'm thinking that since the obstacles don't usually move, that there would more be coordnates that it would avoid when moving. Although, there are usually other robots on the field, so that won't be that easy...

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Part of it is keeping track of where your robot is right now. If you don't have a precise system in place for this (in fact, almost everything has to be precise), it's not very feasible to do so. tl;dr You have to establish precision or a marking system (using the grid on the floor) before starting to think about programming that.

Good luck in September.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

The robot core modules have IMUs built in, and we use two core modules, so two IMUs, which means it can be more precise. Also, the grid isn't actually on the floor, it'd be digitally divided into a grid in the program.

Thanks!

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Hmm, having no physical markings may prove more of a problem because the robot can easily lose track of where it is. Do you have specifics on how precise these IMU's can get? Will it be enough when you are twisting and turning around on the ground for a few minutes?

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I don't remember exact specs, but the IMU is a Bosch 9 axis IMU with Sensor Fusion. It is really accurate if you know how to use it.

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