Description

After two years of playing on a laptop with a crappy APU that costed around 1000 NZD (735 USD) and having to resort to lowering graphics via configuration files and the settings, I've had enough and decided that it's time for me to use the money I saved up for a new PC! I now see why laptops are so overpriced after building it, I built it on carpet too!

About the hardware I reused for it

I've decided to reuse some of the old hardware I have around to save money. My monitor is an Acer P191W (1440x900, 75hz, 19"), my keyboard is a Dell SK-8125, and my mouse is a Logitech G600. Don't worry, I'm fully aware about how outdated these are but hey, they still work and they do their jobs fine! Due to the 16:10 aspect ratio of the monitor and the 75hz, it still makes games look clear and HD enough and the refresh rate is above 60 which is nice! I plan to upgrade these once I save up more money.

The keyboard does require a bit of force to push the keys, can't find the exact number sadly but I've gotten used to it and it's challenging to accidentally press a key on it. The two USB ports on the front near the two stands at the front that lift it up a bit is useful if you need those, it's linear and has a clicking sound when typing but its nowhere near the sound of mechanical keyboard switches. To register a key-press requires bottoming it out which may deter people but I'm fully fine with that since I'd do it anyway for other keyboards.

The mouse has software that is easily configured to give those RGB effects that you commonly see and you can switch it around via the button on the middle of the top of the mouse. The third mouse button is useful for a game that you play a lot and you can configure that to make it useful. (e.g make it the inspect button for CSGO) Although if you're the type to lift your mouse frequently when gaming, it's quite a heavy mouse.

So hey, if you aren't a stickler for aesthetics, don't hesitate to reuse stuff you got already that can be a bit old to save money!

How is it overall?

For the first-time builder, it took me 5h to get it fully working with the OS installed because figuring out where the cables go into was a pain for me! The case is as easy to build in for first-timers and it does what it says on its features! It has very good airflow and as you can see in the images there's heaps of space. I plan to upgrade the cooler in the future and the stock cooler from the Ryzen 5 1600 works as well as they say. Although the cable management I did in the back that's covered up is a bit bad because I've had to connect some cables in the PSU when it's already in the case itself because I didn't know that I needed those. :L

Luckily it booted the first time and worked properly as I installed the OS, the drivers and set the XMP for my RAM to run at rated speeds, so I'm happy with that. The combo of the 1060 and the R5 1600 works awesome for 1080p60 and for computer power when using software! So far I've had no problems at all the day I made and got it working. I know the prices are expensive but I'm not in the US so they're as good as they get. I got my 1060 3GB on sale for 313 USD and without the sale, it's usually around 353'ish USD for many online stores here in New Zealand. Bought all my parts and they shipped to me within the same week for about 3 - 4 days without anything broken or sent back.

And I know the tinted glass on the case is a bit dark, but you can still see the parts within it and playing at night renders it fully invisible for the stealthy purpose it meets. Adding RGB within it will make it look better with the slightly blurred lighting. It's not THAT bad like reviewers say.

Its performance on games

As for the games, I've tried it on the ones I've got now and I have little money to spend on more of them now sadly. I'm sure that if you're that guy who plays every game that comes out and wants it on pretty high graphics, it'll still look good and playable if you have to adjust settings a bit. Here's some of the ones I tested uncapped:

• Killing Floor 2 (Maxed, No Gibs & Fluids) - 150 FPS in intense situations of blood, gore, explosions and gunshots everywhere

• PAYDAY 2 (Maxed) 90 - 150 FPS with bodies on High on the depending on the map and you know how bad its optimization is and how spammy the cop spawns are. Rooftops in Hotline Miami Day 2 was at 90. :L

• Paladins (Maxed) 220 - 300 FPS

• GMod (Maxed) It depends on the servers you play on, it can get to 40 FPS on those cinema servers with a bit too many add-ons... But it can get to around 150 - 200 on lighter servers.

• CSGO is at 150 - 200'ish on Casual games. So in comp that'll be much much higher.

• Fortnite on High is an easy 150 - 200 FPS as well in any situation, I don't see the difference between High and Epic so I just keep it at that. Looks good!

Overall, it's awesome and is a step-up from playing on a laptop with an APU! I chose to cap mine for a significant 10 - 20c reduction in temps while playing on load since I like to keep it cool. If you have any questions about these parts, ask away!

Part Reviews

Motherboard

Does its job well for a reasonably cheap motherboard! The BIOS when installing the OS and the XMP for getting your RAM up to its rated speeds is as easy as it gets for the first-time builder like myself. Two weeks passed since I built my PC with this and no problems so far.

Memory

It's RAM, and it works. Reasonable price if you don't want to go to the expensive 16GB 3000MHz. Don't really need those if you don't play every game that comes out. I know how much Ryzen loves RAM, this is the minimum and it does the job. Just get it up to rated speeds with XMP if need be.

Storage

It's an SSD, it has the expected speeds of modern ones. Guaranteed below 10s log-in time from pressing the power button if you're a fast typer. Boosts loading times for games quite noticeably compared to if you put it on an HDD. For example, Killing Floor 2 takes like 2 - 5 minutes to load on an HDD, put it on an SSD and it'll load up around 15s to the game's main menu.

Wireless Network Adapter

It's a Wi-Fi Adapter that does its job, not much else to say. Simple enough to install.

Keyboard

I like the simple look and the font on them isn't edgy and doesn't make you cringe. It also has weight to it, strong braided cable and its quite sturdy, doesn't bend at all even if its plastic. It would have been nice if it had a usb passthrough, the port on the keyboard is a USB 2.0/3.0 instead of a USB type C that is on the keyboard since its kinda weak and looks fragile, and the LEDs aren't that bright at max, but thry're bright enough.

You should still get it though, the bad reasons are just being nitpicky at this point since there aren't any major flaws. I just use the num pad for macro keys XD

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Comments

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Great job for your first build, maybe drop the cables behind the desk though?

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Heh, sorry! I tend to push my desk forward a lot for some reason, so eventually the cables behind it will flatten so I had no choice.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Makes sense, at least braid them! hehe

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll be able to muster the motivation to do so after a few years.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Minimum 5 years, maximum is when you have a mid life crises.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

It's nice to see that even in a tight budget window, you still went with a rock solid PSU that will give you upgrade headroom and reusability in future builds. You'd be surprised how many first builds make that mistake! Nice work.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah! Definitely considered that as well, I also thought I should have gone with a 1x8 to upgrade for the future but meh, the future's going to be a year or two away.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

In my opinion i would have gone for g.skill but otherwise a solid build will help with deciding my pc parts and making them final

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Understandable, I just picked the RAM I chose because it was the cheapest one I could find that I could buy that was in stock and fitted the usual black theme I was going for on my PC. Hey, it's RAM, and it works!

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

good job and welcome to the club! Be careful, it becomes addictive. =)

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Indeed it does, I suddenly want to make another one and it will take less than 5h for sure since now I have an idea where cables go lol

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Question about standoffs, what did you do with the bottom right standoff?

  • 24 months ago
  • 2 points

The one marked "Panel 1"? That ain't a standoff hole! I don't know what it does lol. The standoff for the bottom-right is at the left of CHA_FAN1 for the AB350 Pro4.

For the mobo I used, I only used six and have two standoffs to spare. It's an ATX mobo, for the holes to the right of it when you've installed the mobo, those aren't for standoffs. I just kept the unused standoffs in the box and small bag that it came in.

I hope that answers your question because I'm unsure of what you're asking.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, I did the exact same as you then, was just a little worried when I watched some builds and they installed all the standoffs. Great build.

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Wow! I'm building a PC with the exact same CPU, Motherboard, and Video Card, and the same amount of Memory and Storage. Do you have any tips or advice you can give me when I build mine?

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Got a few!

  • Don't you mix up the screws, especially for the Hard Drive and the Motherboard, it took me an extra hour with someone to help to get the ssd/hdd screws off the mobo because the standoffs got stuck on them so I needed the other person to use a screwdriver with a hex bit to get it off! The head of the mobo screws are very small compared to the HDD/SSD screws.

  • The CPU cooler can be a bit of a pain to install because you have to push down on the screws to get it near the holes, I also had someone to hold it down for me to make it heaps easier. You may not need to because it may be easier for you to install.

  • Don't carry the mobo by the CPU cooler, no no.

  • The GPU's easy to install, just do it last when you've got most of the cabling and the case is now standing with the mobo in it.

  • Prepare your USB to install the OS by then, who doesn't want to use their PC right away?

  • I built mine standing on a carpet on an MDF table with laminated wood pattern, so don't get too paranoid about ESD! Just connect your PSU to the wall with the wall plug switched on but the PSU itself off. Touch it when you handle a component.

  • Try to figure out which cables you need if you're not using a non-modular psu, it's a pain to install the ones you need when its already secure in the case with the bracket on it. Still doable but ehh

  • Watch the video titled "First 5 Things to Do with a New PC Build" by Paul's Hardware when you're done, it's really helpful and you'll be able to get your new PC going and ready to play quickly!

Installing the cooler and figuring out where the cables go for the first time was the most difficult things to do, but after you do it it'll be easier when you make another one and will definitely take less time than the time it took to build your first PC, good luck!

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

Thank you! I have someone who knows what they're doing helping me, so I think it will be great!