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Build Guide

Budget Home/Office Build

by manirelli

18
50 Comments

Revision History

Description

CPU

Our CPU of choice for this home/office machine is the Intel Pentium G4560. This processor has two cores, hyperthreading, and is aptly suited for all software in the Microsoft Office suite or the comparable open source offerings. The Pentium G4560 includes a stock cooler, so 3rd-party cooler is not necessary.

Motherboard

We're using a parametric selection of motherboards which will show the best priced motherboard based on our specifications. All of the motherboards feature the B250 chipset and an LGA 1151 socket for compatibility with the Pentium G4560. They include 4 DIMM slots for up to 64GB of DDR4 RAM. They're also capable of using the CPU's integrated HD Graphics 610 which is important for our office build as we will not be adding a dedicated graphics card.

Memory

A parametric filter is being applied to choose the best priced 2x4GB kit of memory within Intel's recommended specifications. With this selection, we have space on the motherboards for an additional kit of RAM, leaving room for future expansion.

Storage

We're also using parametric filters to select the best priced 480GB or larger SSD available. For a simple office machine you likely don't need a lot of space but ideally it is as fast as possible without breaking the bank which is why is machine only has a single SSD and no mechanical drive. Everyone's needs are different, so feel free to change out capacities to fit yours. For example, if 480GB feels cramped to you, I recommend picking up a mechanical hard drive for another 1 or 2TB or storage space.

Case

The Cooler Master MasterBox Lite 3 is a budget friendly, quiet case that can fit all of our components. It offers decent cable management, which can sometimes be a problem at our budget, and there's room to expand with hard drives or a solid state drive. It also has 2 front panel USB 3.0 ports and a 5.25" bay for our optical drive. Cases tend to be highly personal choices, so make sure you browse our listed cases to see what suits you.

PSU

For the PSU, we're using a parametric selection of a few well-reviewed non-modular units, which are all rated for good power efficiency and can provide plenty of power for this build.

Part List Customize This Part List

Compatibility Check: No issues/incompatibilities found.

Estimated Wattage: 129W
Component Selection Base Promo Shipping Tax Price Where
CPU £52.96 FREE £52.96 CCL Computers Buy
Motherboard
From parametric filter
  • Chipset: Intel B250
  • RAM Slots: 4 - 16
£66.17 FREE £66.17 CCL Computers Buy
Memory
From parametric filter
  • Type: 288-pin DIMM
  • Size: 8GB (2x4GB)
£49.55 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime £49.55 Amazon UK Buy
Storage
From parametric filter
  • Capacity: 480GB - 10TB
  • Type: SSD
£96.51 FREE £96.51 CCL Computers Buy
Case £34.98 £34.98 Novatech Buy
Power Supply £32.88 £32.88 Aria PC Buy
Optical Drive
From parametric filter
  • Capability: DVD Writer
£12.99 Free two-day shipping with Amazon Prime £12.99 Amazon UK Buy
Total: £346.04
* Using your selected merchants and only including nearby in-store pickup prices)
* Some physical dimension restrictions cannot (yet) be automatically checked, such as cpu cooler / RAM clearance with modules using tall heat spreaders.

Comments Sorted by:

WirelessCables 1 Build 4 points 1 month ago

This. G4560.

I approve =D

ThatTechKid 3 points 1 month ago

This + G4560 = POWER for an Home/Office Build.

Namnguyen 2 points 1 month ago

this build is great with the petinum g4560

Slurth 1 Build 2 points 29 days ago

Get a 1050ti and a new PSU and you have yourself a decent office/gaming PC.

deathbat6916 2 points 27 days ago

430W is more than enough for a 1050 Ti lol.

Slurth 1 Build 1 point 27 days ago

300*

deathbat6916 1 point 27 days ago

300 is recommended, 430 is way more than you need for a 1050 ti

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deathbat6916 1 point 14 days ago

Nooo, stay the hell away from the 750 Ti these days unless you're going used.

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deathbat6916 1 point 11 days ago

You recommended a 750 Ti which in many 2016 titles is barely able to play in 1080p.

EstDaniel 2 points 3 days ago

Lol, I have GTX 750 Ti and I can play many 2016 games.

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TotalInsanity4 1 point 1 month ago

Is there any room for cable management in that case?? It looks like the back panel is basically flush with the back of the motherboard tray...

manirelli staff submitter 7 Builds 3 points 1 month ago

Not behind the tray but there is room to work with to tie up your cables. Cable management isn't as important without a window.

TotalInsanity4 2 points 1 month ago

Fari enough, thanks c:

RedHawk02 3 points 9 days ago

It's also not very important except for aesthetics if you have a window or just so you can easily find everything if you'll be upgrading constantly.

Luke from LinusTechTips did a video on whether or not cable management helps keep your PC cool (because people seem to think it does) and he had to stuff in a bunch of boxes, shirts, and other random stuff to the point where you can't see the components because there's junk stuffed to the brim of the case just to make it increase by a couple degrees Celsius.

spymamma22 1 point 1 month ago

I made it a bit budget, but I took some inspiration from this build and decided to make a game edition https://pcpartpicker.com/guide/fNTwrH/my-version

Megarocket16 1 point 25 days ago

Everyone was flaming at me for telling him not use the Seasonic PSU, and use the EVGA instead because it was cheaper... Now he puts in an EVGA 430W 80+. You guys are totally fine with that...

WirelessCables 1 Build 2 points 17 days ago

So... Shouldn't you be happy he threw in an EVGA power supply?

(As long as it's cheaper)

Megarocket16 1 point 25 days ago

Also, I recommend the ASRock H170A-X1/3.1 which is $19 cheaper. Motherboards don't give performance, so any would do for an office computer. I live in Canada so the currency is different.

pegotico 2 Builds 1 point 24 days ago

Just remember that the H170 will need a bios update for the newer kabylake and only some high end Z170/Z270 will let you update bios without a cpu, so a B250 will guarantee compatibility out of the box. :)

Tech22 1 point 21 days ago

Have you heard of H270?? It also does support it out of the box :)

pegotico 2 Builds 1 point 21 days ago

yes all the newer mobos do support kabylake out of box..

Megarocket16 1 point 11 days ago

Well, it depends I guess. The new mobos are more expensive than the older ones, so if you get a older one, you could get a BIOS update, the cost could be cheaper, though the efficiency of using it right away is gone.

Megarocket16 1 point 19 days ago

Can't you just request the manufacturer/seller for an update?

pegotico 2 Builds 1 point 19 days ago

How is that going to help? You still need to update motherboard and you wont be able to do so with a non compatible cpu. You would either have to send the motherboard to manufacturer or buy a cheap skylake cpu to update bios which honestly doesn't make sense and is too much of a hassle. Some of the more expensive motherboards (Z170,Z270) do have the option to update bios without a cpu. So just get a compatible motherboard.

Megarocket16 1 point 11 days ago

Update: So, as time passes by the motherboards released become cheaper, and I found another decent one cheaper than the one in this build, there's only 2 ram slots, but really, 8GB doesn't really need an upgrade, for an office computer.

deathbat6916 0 points 11 days ago

When I just have Chrome and basic tasks open I get very close to that 8GB limit so I wouldn't be so sure to be 100% honest

gizzemac 1 point 9 hours ago

lol your trolling xd

deathbat6916 1 point 8 hours ago

I'm saying a 750 Ti has to make way too many compromises to get playable performance these days. This game for example: https://youtu.be/K-p2S0Uzdl4 barely getting 30fps with decent settings until you turn resolution down.

Webatron 1 point 24 days ago

I this good for school and casual YouTube watching?

kingtanky 1 point 24 days ago

The only limit here would be the storage. I think 480 GB should be enough as I haven't used even up to 120 GB with all of my school documents.

Inygms 1 point 22 days ago

Yes it would. 480GB is way more than enough for documents, photos, and consumption apps. The G4560 will handle it without a sweat.

Megarocket16 1 point 19 days ago

No, I recommend a laptop for school, it's so much more portable.

CoolBullDog29 1 point 19 days ago

Is a video card necessary because i plan on using this next year in college?

manirelli staff submitter 7 Builds 1 point 19 days ago

Nope, this uses the onboard graphics on the CPU.

CoolBullDog29 1 point 18 days ago

Okay thanks

bleed4glory 1 point 13 days ago

I would love to see a home office build that uses a Mini-ITX case. Something for older parents who look at a tower with fear :)

neifirst 1 point 12 days ago

How many and what kind of video outputs does this build provide?

Bigdonkeydave 1 point 5 hours ago

Could this be a gaming pc?

R3negadeGamer -6 points 1 month ago

In all honesty, you won't be able to do more with this build than run office applications. 480GB doesn't give a lot of loose room to download large extra applications, and DDR4-2133 8GB ram runs noticeably slower than DDR4-3000... I doubt you would have an easy time running something like Minecraft with other things open. But for a low-key build with a $400 budget, this is a well thought out build. If you are going to be spending money and time to build a computer though, there is no point to down $400 on something minimal like this... try just spending $200 more dollars and the computer quality will greatly increase.

WirelessCables 1 Build 6 points 1 month ago

In all honesty, you won't be able to do more with this build than run office applications.

You can easily do much more than that, which is the whole point of the hyperthreaded Pentium. If you wanter to run office applications only, you could get by on a Core 2 Duo.

and DDR4-2133 8GB ram runs noticeably slower than DDR4-3000

No it doesn't... CAS latency differences are generally more noticeable.

I doubt you would have an easy time running something like Minecraft with other things open.

Minecraft is more CPU bound than GPU bound. A dual core, hyperthreaded CPU can easily handle Minecraft with a program or 2 in the background.

there is no point to down $400 on something minimal like this...

It's an office PC. It's not designed to run games. Hence the lack of a discrete GPU.

526christian 0 points 1 month ago

No it doesn't... CAS latency differences are generally more noticeable.

Oh? How do you figure?

WirelessCables 1 Build 1 point 1 month ago

None of them are very noticeable, but from a little bit of research I've heard that...

The CAS latency is given in cycles. So, a CAS9 RAM will take 9 cycles to respond and the CAS6, 6 cycles.

Now putting it together: the DDR3 2000 CAS9 will take 9/2000 seconds, which is equal to 0,0045 seconds, to respond while the DDR3 1600 CAS 6 will take 6/1600, which is equal to 0,0038 seconds, to respond. Thus, the 1600 one is faster.

From what I've seen, the relationship of CAS latency and speed vs. 'actual latency' is still somewhat cloudy because CAS isn't a very accurate measure. I've just heard in the past that CAS matters more, even if it's a very tiny change in performance, like speed. I should have mentioned this in my previous reply, though.

If this is wrong, someone please correct me =D

526christian 3 points 1 month ago

DIMM speeds effect CAS latency by affecting the clock period. The higher you go, the lower the CAS latency is in real time (something shown in that link) at the same CAS latency in clock cycles. CAS latency is OK to look at as long as you are using it correctly - i.e. understanding that unless you're looking at unusual or ridiculous CAS latencies for the respective rated data transfer rate(s), increasing DIMM speeds will outdo or at least practically negate CAS latency increases and CAS latency differences alone won't have a big effect on main memory access latencies, even in an idle main memory subsystem where there isn't additional queuing latency at the MC adding to the latency. Something else to be considered is that DIMM speeds also affect memory throughput and queuing latency at the memory controller (at least in modern Intel desktops) almost linearly, the first of which is only marginally affected by CAS latency. All that considered, there's no way, hardware-wise, CAS latency differences will "generally" have more noticeable effects than DIMM speed differences.

WirelessCables 1 Build 1 point 1 month ago

Yes.

+1 for the effort. How much time did that take? =D

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Sephius 1 Build 5 points 1 month ago

Now, try convincing your boss, that his secretary's PC needs a 3000MHz ram, and a Z170/Z270 to run that kind of speed, only to use Microsoft Office, and chat with costumers. Or your dad that only wants to play FreeCell or poker online. And then, say the price difference. Good Luck.

WirelessCables 1 Build 1 point 17 days ago

Now, try convincing your boss, that his secretary's PC needs a 3000MHz ram, and a Z170/Z270 to run that kind of speed, only to use Microsoft Office, and chat with costumers.

Nice =D

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Reason:
Note: Wattages are estimates only. Actual power draw may differ from listed values.
Component Estimated Wattage
Intel Pentium G4560 3.5GHz Dual-Core Processor 6W - 54W
Gigabyte GA-B250M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard 15W - 60W
Crucial Ballistix Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2666 Memory 5W - 5W
Mushkin Chronos 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive 2W - 10W
Total: 28W - 129W